Legacy

Event
Sat, Jul 30, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 4:00 pm
Women and Our Woods Workshop for Women Woodland Owners

Hidden Valley Nature Center  131 Egypt Rd., Jefferson, ME 04348, July 30, 2016, 9:00-4:00

$45 ($40 for HVNC, Midcoast Conservancy, MOFGA, MFLT members), $25 Students    Scholarships available!!

Women and Our Woods

Empowering Maine’s women woodland owners to steward our forestlands
Article
Kenna, who has attended two Women and Their Woods educational retreats, explains, “I think the whole family has to be involved in caring for the land—and women are at the heart of the family."
Article
Leila Pinchot, Women and Their Woods graduate and PA landowner, writes about her family's property in Milford, PA where she and her father are working to reintroduce the American Chestnut to the Milford Experimental Forest.
Article
My mom is the reason I'm connected to our forestland. I'm shy to write about my land connection, which manifests as creative inspiration, much less talk about it, because my mom passed away over two years ago. Now the reasons for loving our stewardship forestland are so deep, so nuanced, and so filled with grief that I fear I might fall apart were I to explain it all. Simply put: all reasons lead back to my mom.
Article
It’s likely you have children, perhaps grandchildren, and it’s probable that you own forest land too. If you wish your offspring to have some attachment to that land, if you expect them to care for it as you do when you turn it over to them, begin now!
Article
Memory of Trees by Galya Marty is the story of a daughter growing up on a dairy farm in east central Minnesota. The trees around the farm made a lasting impact on the author and are an important theme throughout the book.
Article
A group of land parcels in Sullivan County, New York, known as Mongaup Sanctuary, is protected with a conservation easement with Delaware Highlands Conservancy. The 100 acres include a wetland with a creek running through it, open fields once used for farming, and woodland.
Article
Shary Skoloff, a landowner with property on the Pennsylvania and New York border, recalls how she and her husband found a quiet piece of land, worked hard to nurture it back to a working farm and ultimately are leaving a legacy by sharing their connection to the land with the next generation.
Article
I am so grateful during this season of blessings that my mom took the time over many years to speak with Dad and me about her deep love of our family forestland, her concerns about the forest, her desires for habitat renewal and stewardship, and her vision and goals. I am so grateful she and Dad planned for Mom’s passage by creating a trust, consulting a lawyer, creating a solid will, and communicating directly with me.
Article
Brenda Woodard, a retired U.S. Forest Service forester and a landowner in Douglas County, is the daughter of a former Lane County Extension Forester, Steve Woodard, who was the Oregon Tree Farmer of the Year in 2004. He lives on the tree farm that has been in his family since his grandfather purchased it in 1948. “His vision and passion are what inspired my husband and me to become forest  land owners,” she said.
Article
Lon and Laura Rankin own several small and moderate size parcels of woodland in Oregon’s mid-Willamette valley. They’d taken care of the legal side of succession planning long ago.  “I learned about the importance of planning from my father and uncle. They both had trusts and the transfer to the next generation went so smoothly,” said Lon. So as soon as it made sense, they set up a trust too. They had been proactive and were content they were on top of the issue.
Article
For a majority of woodland owners leaving a land legacy for the next generation is an important ownership objective. Less than half of those who feel that way will successfully create such a legacy. This is sad because most of them could.
Article
Oregon WOW member Marti Willis bravely shares her heartbreaking story of losing her land so that we all can avoid the same pitfalls.
Article
Let’s be honest.  No one wants to think about their own death.  However, if we flip the thinking, we can focus on how we help our loved ones in that transition period.  It is important to think about what will happen to your land in the future.  After investing heart, soul (and probably money) in your property, doesn’t it make sense to plan for a transition of that property to the next generation or to an organization of your choice? 
Event
Fri, Oct 7, 2016 - 9:30 am
until 4:00 pm
Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska, MN
Article
For us the decision to have a conservation easement on our forestland seemed like a no-brainer, but when we started analyzing all the aspects—-what we call all the “what-ifs”—-we knew we needed more time to make a decision. Once we took that time, we got all tangled in those possibilities. It was incredibly difficult to sort through emotions, thoughts, facts, and possibilities.
Event
Thu, Sep 15, 2016 - 4:00 pm
until 2:00 pm
Where: Highlights Foundation Facility, Boyd's Mill, Milanville, PA

$200 includes three nights lodging, meals, snacks, and all workshop materials. Scholarships available. Applications are due August 1, 2016 and are available online at www.DelawareHighlands.org/watw. You do not need to own land to attend. 
Event
Sat, Jul 30, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 4:00 pm
Women and Our Woods Workshop for Women Woodland Owners

Hidden Valley Nature Center  131 Egypt Rd., Jefferson, ME 04348, July 30, 2016, 9:00-4:00

$45 ($40 for HVNC, Midcoast Conservancy, MOFGA, MFLT members), $25 Students    Scholarships available!!

Women and Our Woods