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Success looks like...
She had lost her husband two years before. He was always the one to do the forest management stuff while she managed horses! Now she was left without a clue of how she should manage the forest. Her plan was to just - let it be. Accompanying her friend who invited her on an informal Oregon WOWNet hike changed everything and left her in tears of relief. After talking with women on the hike who are managing forests on their own, she said she felt like she could do it too. She instantly felt she had a support network and a huge barrier was lifted. It’s amazing what a walk in the woods, with peers, can do!
Article
Kiera Quigley, National Association of State Foresters summer intern and Fisheries & Wildlife undergrad at Michigan State

 
Article
My mom called our forestland in northern Idaho a “spot of paradise.” Mom was the first to point out a grand fir that might fall, to see a moose on the pasture, and to notice Western larch needles changing color. She passed away eight years ago, and we try to honor her by caring for our forestland.
Article
Ponderosa pine forests of the Southwest are home to the native bark beetle. However, human influence, denser forests, and increased temperatures and drought events have led to recent bark beetle outbreaks that threaten the health of ponderosa stands. Where dead trees stand, fire can move as much as three times more rapidly, creating dangerous conditions for firefighters and residents. Restoration treatments can be used to help restore the balance needed in ponderosa pine ecosystems.
Article
What do all these insects have in common? They were all brought to North America from Asia or Europe. These exotic insects have caused havoc in our forests because the trees they attack have developed little resistance to them. Our forests are filled with native insects that attack and sometimes kill trees, but because these insects evolved along with their hosts, they don’t cause complete mortality that non-native species can.
Article
The stream meandered through forests and wetlands like a crystal clear thread. The stream was so clear you could easily see the rocks on the bottom and watch fish glide through the water. I now understand the relationship between healthy forests and streams that provide clean water, wildlife habitat and opportunities to relax and cool your feet on a hot day.
Article
Success looks like...
She had lost her husband two years before. He was always the one to do the forest management stuff while she managed horses! Now she was left without a clue of how she should manage the forest. Her plan was to just - let it be. Accompanying her friend who invited her on an informal Oregon WOWNet hike changed everything and left her in tears of relief. After talking with women on the hike who are managing forests on their own, she said she felt like she could do it too. She instantly felt she had a support network and a huge barrier was lifted. It’s amazing what a walk in the woods, with peers, can do!
Article
Kiera Quigley, National Association of State Foresters summer intern and Fisheries & Wildlife undergrad at Michigan State

 
Article
My mom called our forestland in northern Idaho a “spot of paradise.” Mom was the first to point out a grand fir that might fall, to see a moose on the pasture, and to notice Western larch needles changing color.
Article
Ponderosa pine forests of the Southwest are home to the native bark beetle. However, human influence, denser forests, and increased temperatures and drought events have led to recent bark beetle outbreaks that threaten the health of ponderosa stands. Where dead trees stand, fire can move as much as three times more rapidly, creating dangerous conditions for firefighters and residents. Restoration treatments can be used to help restore the balance needed in ponderosa pine ecosystems.
Article
What do all these insects have in common? They were all brought to North America from Asia or Europe. These exotic insects have caused havoc in our forests because the trees they attack have developed little resistance to them. Our forests are filled with native insects that attack and sometimes kill trees, but because these insects evolved along with their hosts, they don’t cause complete mortality that non-native species can.
Article
The stream meandered through forests and wetlands like a crystal clear thread. The stream was so clear you could easily see the rocks on the bottom and watch fish glide through the water. I now understand the relationship between healthy forests and streams that provide clean water, wildlife habitat and opportunities to relax and cool your feet on a hot day.