Invasive Species Control

Article
by Morgan Smith, American Forest Foundation, and Lisa Hayden, New England Forestry Foundation

 

Your woods offer a variety of benefits including recreation, wildlife, family legacy, scenery, income, and more. Regardless of what value your woods provide, you likely love your woods and want to keep them healthy into the future.  
Article
 



Flickr photo by F.D. Richards

With summer on the horizon and the gardening stores and farmers markets full of beautiful plants it can be hard to resist the urge to try something new in your landscape. Please proceed with caution!
Article
Photo: Flowering Oriental bittersweet, By Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org



As the weather warms and we head outside it’s a good time to look for new invasive species.
Article
Photo caption: Can you see the invasives in need of management? By A. Gupta, UMN Extension

Do you know about invasive species and want to manage them but don’t know where to start? If so you’re not alone. There are many natural resource professional, active volunteers and woodland owners that have gotten discouraged and become paralyzed by uncertainty. The University of Minnesota rebranded some great information originally from the Indiana Chapter of The Nature Conservancy about how to prioritize invasives management.
Event
Sat, Oct 22, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 3:00 pm
October 14th - registration deadline
Article
Tired of watching reruns on television? Check out this University of California Extension education series for woodland owners.
Article
I hope you’ve heard of garlic mustard before, but if not here’s the low down: Garlic mustard was first introduced as a garden herb but escaped and has been causing problems ever since. It is an herbaceous plant that takes two years to reach maturity. Garlic mustard is allelopathic, meaning it produces chemicals that reduce the growth of neighboring plants, so when garlic mustard gets introduced into a site it can quickly outcompete native understory vegetation.
Article
Blooming from early-June well into July, Poison Hemlock, Conium maculatum, is becoming more and more noticeable along roadsides and in moist meadows. April is a good time to make sure you can identify Poison hemlock!
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Deciding how to manage an invasive species infestation can be intimidating. Thankfully, there is help available.
Article
On Wednesday, March 25, the Forest Guild led a workshop for women woodland owners in York County, Maine. The workshop was hosted by the Wells National Estuarine Reserve. Presenters included Amanda Mahaffey, northeast region director for the Forest Guild; Patty Cormier, a district forester for the Maine Forest Service, and Nancy Olmstead, invasive plant biologist for the Maine Natural Areas Program.
Article
Fall is finally here in parts of the South!  Trees are beginning to change color, hunters are getting ready for the season, nights are finally getting cooler, and campers and homeowners are thinking about enjoying those nice, cool evenings with a fire in the fireplace or chimenea. But, those beautiful colors and evenings could be destroyed by a deadly pest that might be hiding in your firewood: the Emerald Ash Borer.
Article
The second PlayCleanGo Day will be Saturday, June 14. Consider volunteering at a park near you to help educate and prevent the spread of terrestrial invasive species.
Article
by Morgan Smith, American Forest Foundation, and Lisa Hayden, New England Forestry Foundation

 

Your woods offer a variety of benefits including recreation, wildlife, family legacy, scenery, income, and more. Regardless of what value your woods provide, you likely love your woods and want to keep them healthy into the future.  
Article
 



Flickr photo by F.D. Richards

With summer on the horizon and the gardening stores and farmers markets full of beautiful plants it can be hard to resist the urge to try something new in your landscape. Please proceed with caution!
Article
Photo: Flowering Oriental bittersweet, By Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org



As the weather warms and we head outside it’s a good time to look for new invasive species.
Article
Photo caption: Can you see the invasives in need of management? By A. Gupta, UMN Extension

Do you know about invasive species and want to manage them but don’t know where to start? If so you’re not alone. There are many natural resource professional, active volunteers and woodland owners that have gotten discouraged and become paralyzed by uncertainty. The University of Minnesota rebranded some great information originally from the Indiana Chapter of The Nature Conservancy about how to prioritize invasives management.
Event
Sat, Oct 22, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 3:00 pm
October 14th - registration deadline
Article
Tired of watching reruns on television? Check out this University of California Extension education series for woodland owners.