Conservation Easement

Article
This past September marked the 5th Women and Their Woods Educational Retreat hosted by the Delaware Highlands Conservancy. The event this year was held at the Highlights Family Foundation's Workshop Facility in scenic Wayne County, PA.
Article
My mom called our forestland in northern Idaho a “spot of paradise.” Mom was the first to point out a grand fir that might fall, to see a moose on the pasture, and to notice Western larch needles changing color. She passed away eight years ago, and we try to honor her by caring for our forestland. Since my brother and I live far away, all of the work falls on Dad.
Article
by Nia Becker, Clare Conservation District, Michigan
Article
Oregon WOW member Marti Willis bravely shares her heartbreaking story of losing her land so that we all can avoid the same pitfalls.
Article
Let’s be honest.  No one wants to think about their own death.  However, if we flip the thinking, we can focus on how we help our loved ones in that transition period.  It is important to think about what will happen to your land in the future.  After investing heart, soul (and probably money) in your property, doesn’t it make sense to plan for a transition of that property to the next generation or to an organization of your choice? 
Article
For us the decision to have a conservation easement on our forestland seemed like a no-brainer, but when we started analyzing all the aspects—-what we call all the “what-ifs”—-we knew we needed more time to make a decision. Once we took that time, we got all tangled in those possibilities. It was incredibly difficult to sort through emotions, thoughts, facts, and possibilities.
Event
Thu, Sep 15, 2016 - 4:00 pm
until 2:00 pm
Where: Highlights Foundation Facility, Boyd's Mill, Milanville, PA

$200 includes three nights lodging, meals, snacks, and all workshop materials. Scholarships available. Applications are due August 1, 2016 and are available online at www.DelawareHighlands.org/watw. You do not need to own land to attend. 
Article
Kenna, who has attended two Women and Their Woods educational retreats, explains, “I think the whole family has to be involved in caring for the land—and women are at the heart of the family."
Article
Land and water. We always talk about them together, but why?
The reason is simple: to care for the land is to care for the water.
Article
Leila Pinchot, Women and Their Woods graduate and PA landowner, writes about her family's property in Milford, PA where she and her father are working to reintroduce the American Chestnut to the Milford Experimental Forest.
Article
A group of land parcels in Sullivan County, New York, known as Mongaup Sanctuary, is protected with a conservation easement with Delaware Highlands Conservancy. The 100 acres include a wetland with a creek running through it, open fields once used for farming, and woodland.
Article
Shary Skoloff, a landowner with property on the Pennsylvania and New York border, recalls how she and her husband found a quiet piece of land, worked hard to nurture it back to a working farm and ultimately are leaving a legacy by sharing their connection to the land with the next generation.
Article
This past September marked the 5th Women and Their Woods Educational Retreat hosted by the Delaware Highlands Conservancy. The event this year was held at the Highlights Family Foundation's Workshop Facility in scenic Wayne County, PA.
Article
My mom called our forestland in northern Idaho a “spot of paradise.” Mom was the first to point out a grand fir that might fall, to see a moose on the pasture, and to notice Western larch needles changing color. She passed away eight years ago, and we try to honor her by caring for our forestland. Since my brother and I live far away, all of the work falls on Dad.
Article
by Nia Becker, Clare Conservation District, Michigan
Article
Oregon WOW member Marti Willis bravely shares her heartbreaking story of losing her land so that we all can avoid the same pitfalls.
Article
Let’s be honest.  No one wants to think about their own death.  However, if we flip the thinking, we can focus on how we help our loved ones in that transition period.  It is important to think about what will happen to your land in the future.  After investing heart, soul (and probably money) in your property, doesn’t it make sense to plan for a transition of that property to the next generation or to an organization of your choice? 
Article
For us the decision to have a conservation easement on our forestland seemed like a no-brainer, but when we started analyzing all the aspects—-what we call all the “what-ifs”—-we knew we needed more time to make a decision. Once we took that time, we got all tangled in those possibilities. It was incredibly difficult to sort through emotions, thoughts, facts, and possibilities.