Northwest

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We didn't think our creek had any fish because a section goes dry every summer. But looks are deceiving. Recently scientists conducting field surveys in our area, confirmed that we do have trout.
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--by Jois Child
"The early leaves surprise me... "
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Mid-January is the start of amphibian (frogs, toads, and salamanders) breeding season! So, leave those fuzzy slippers by the door, put on a pair of mud boots or waders if you got ‘em, and go herping!
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Forester and woodland owner Barrie Brusila of Mid-Maine Forestry in Warren, ME shares some of her lessons learned in a simple handout entitled "Timber Harvesting Do's and Don'ts."
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An opinion piece by Amy Grotta after the November 2014 Oregon election on the GMO labeling. "Of course, the ballot measure had to do with food labeling, not trees, but it got me thinking that it might be worth looking at how GMOs relate to forestry."
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In 1824, London’s Royal Horticultural Society sent the young botanist David Douglas on an expedition to the Pacific Northwest to study and to collect native flora and fauna. The sensitive details of Douglas's journey are marvelously captured by the contemporary author and naturalist Jack Nisbet in The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest.
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David Douglas: A Naturalist at Work connects Douglas’s historical explorations with Nisbet’s contemporary ones. Nisbet opens the lens of history, as the text becomes a parallel experience where the reader visits places both in historical and contemporary time, effortlessly traveling between the two. Nisbet’s evocative vignettes follow David Douglas’s journals out into the field.
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Part memoir, narrative nonfiction, and natural history, "Eating Dirt" manages to capture both what it feels like to engage in hard seasonal physical labor and what it might feel like if you were the forest itself.
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"Seeds: One Man’s Serendipitous Journey to Find the Trees That Inspired Famous American Writers from Faulkner to Kerouac, Welty to Wharton" is dedicated to Horan’s love for “all the trees that have provided the vital wood flesh for millions of magical books throughout the ages.” Horan’s journey collecting actual seeds from famous authors’ trees is an engaging travelogue, homage, and memoir.
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Christine Byl writes about place and our connection to land and the reasons why we labor rather than sit. Byl eloquently reflects on her chosen path of work: "If I felt my work aligned with damage and asphalt over trees and space, I would like to think I could never have done it this long."
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Everyone I asked emphasized safety. Wives of loggers came up to me at church and asked if I was being safe. “Do you use chaps, eye protection, a hard hat, something for your ears, my dear?”
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Join us April 3-5 at the HJ Andrews forest in Blue River, Oregon.
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Oregon WOW member Marti Willis bravely shares her heartbreaking story of losing her land so that we all can avoid the same pitfalls.
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For us the decision to have a conservation easement on our forestland seemed like a no-brainer, but when we started analyzing all the aspects—-what we call all the “what-ifs”—-we knew we needed more time to make a decision. Once we took that time, we got all tangled in those possibilities. It was incredibly difficult to sort through emotions, thoughts, facts, and possibilities.
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Tired of watching reruns on television? Check out this University of California Extension education series for woodland owners.
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Sat, Aug 27, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 4:00 pm
Where: Claremont Forest – at the intersection of 396th Dr SE and SE 53rd St, Snoqualmie, WA 

$25 per individual | $35 per couple | Student and Master Gardner discounts available
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There’s a new kid in town in the world of wildfire, known by the name of the Washington State Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network (WAFAC).
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Aesthetics and recreation are two of the leading reasons woodland owners designate for why they own forested property. After talking with some local Oregon Women Owning Woodlands Network members it is obvious that recreation is an important element of forest ownership for them. They are out in the woods doing everything from horseback riding to plant identification.