Living with Wildlife

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If you want to hear this bird sing, you need to maintain a unique forest habitat...young Jack pine trees.
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Woodland owners and managers have many reasons for owning land; enjoying wildlife and providing wildlife habitat consistently rank as one of the most important values. The following article will give you a couple ideas of how you can make sure you are creating the habitat you want.
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The premise of The Forest Unseen: A Year’s Watch in Nature is simple enough, but only a naturalist like David George Haskell could write this beautiful book. Poetic and scientific, The Forest Unseen is extraordinary.
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On Wednesday, March 25, the Forest Guild led a workshop for women woodland owners in York County, Maine. The workshop was hosted by the Wells National Estuarine Reserve. Presenters included Amanda Mahaffey, northeast region director for the Forest Guild; Patty Cormier, a district forester for the Maine Forest Service, and Nancy Olmstead, invasive plant biologist for the Maine Natural Areas Program.
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Mid-January is the start of amphibian (frogs, toads, and salamanders) breeding season! So, leave those fuzzy slippers by the door, put on a pair of mud boots or waders if you got ‘em, and go herping!
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Mammal Tracks and Scat: Life-Size Pocket Guide by Lynn Levine
A waterproof, 44 page pocket-size book, with life-size illustrations (Yes, even the bear!) It’s a guide that’s great for tracking through all seasons.
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Leila Pinchot, Women and Their Woods graduate and PA landowner, writes about her family's property in Milford, PA where she and her father are working to reintroduce the American Chestnut to the Milford Experimental Forest.
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Guest writer: Becky McPeake, Extension Wildlife, UA Division of Agriculture.

Do your woods look like a plow has run through it? Are you having problems with something damaging your tree seedlings, and it’s not deer? Are there mud holes along your waterways? These are indications you’ve got feral hogs.
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Conservationists estimate that up to 20 percent of forested wildlife depends on dead wood like snags and down logs for food, habitat, or cover. Within normal healthy woodland they are essential features, but they are often missing from more regularly maintained forests. It is just too easy to dismiss that log as potential firewood, rather than giving it the chance to live up to another potential simply by leaving the log where it lies.
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Join the 2013 class of women forest landowners for a four-day workshop full of exciting educational programs and field trips related to the care and management of forestland. Women from across the Mid-Atlantic region who own, care for, or are interested in learning more about forestland are encouraged to attend. The workshop takes place from September 26-September 29.
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Guest post by Margaret Mils, Oregon WOWnet member
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Guest Post By Phyllis Ridge, forest landowner and 2012 WaTW Retreat graduate
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Tired of watching reruns on television? Check out this University of California Extension education series for woodland owners.
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Sat, Aug 27, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 4:00 pm
Where: Claremont Forest – at the intersection of 396th Dr SE and SE 53rd St, Snoqualmie, WA 

$25 per individual | $35 per couple | Student and Master Gardner discounts available
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Article by guest author Pam Wells
How tailgate tree parties with professional teams helped create a detailed forest management plan, 180 acres of pre-commercial thinning, roadwork repair, and the hope of stream habitat improvement for salmon and trout.
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Sat, Jul 30, 2016 - 9:00 am
until 4:00 pm
Women and Our Woods Workshop for Women Woodland Owners

Hidden Valley Nature Center  131 Egypt Rd., Jefferson, ME 04348, July 30, 2016, 9:00-4:00

$45 ($40 for HVNC, Midcoast Conservancy, MOFGA, MFLT members), $25 Students    Scholarships available!!

Women and Our Woods

Empowering Maine’s women woodland owners to steward our forestlands
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Early morning wrapped in woven wool
white breath dissolving into fog,
one fawn lay supine near my feet
sweet docile sister grazing in the weeds.
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Forests along the Atlantic Flyway provides critical nesting and breeding habitat for countless warblers, thrushes, and other familiar feathered friends seeking a summer home.Learn how forest stewardship can enhance the health of our forests, local wood economies, and priority songbird populations.